Publications

The documents on this page are guides to issues we frequently hear about at Hobart Community Legal Service. If you can’t see a guide for your legal problem, get in touch with us for help.

These guides are intended to give general information about the law in Tasmania. While every effort has been made to ensure accuracy at the time of writing, the law is complex and constantly changing. Moreover, legal exactness is not always possible in a publications of this nature. The guide should not be used as a substitute for legal advice.

 

About Us Expand

CentrelinkExpand

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It is important to let Centrelink know of any change in your circumstances so that your information is kept up to date. Any change may alter the amount of your payment. There could be consequences for not updating your information with Centrelink or giving false or misleading information. If Centrelink makes a decision to change your payment you have a right to know the reasons for their decision. If you are unhappy about the decision you can challenge the decision. There is no cost in challenging a decision by Centrelink.

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Problems with Centrelink

Updated: 4 July 2012

How can the Welfare Rights Service help you? The Welfare Rights Service can provide you with information about Centrelink payments, other welfare entitlements and can represent you in discussions with Centrelink. The Service is open to individuals or organisations.

For Older PeopleExpand

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Financial Matters for Older People

Updated: 1 August 2018

It is important to plan ahead for your finances. If you are an older person experiencing financial difficulty there are places you can go to get assistance. You can get help from a free and confidential financial counsellor who can help you negotiate your debts, organise your finances and create a budget.

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Guardianship and Power of Attorney

Updated: 1 August 2018

If you have an accident, illness, or disability, such as dementia of Alzheimer's Disease, you may not be able to make decisions for yourself. It may be best to choose someone you trust in advance to make decisions for you for when you are no longer able to make them for yourself.

Natural DisasterExpand

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Replacing Lost Documents

Updated: 1 August 2018

Do not worry if you have lost legal documents due to natural disaster, such as bushfire. Fees associated with replacing lost documents as a result of natural disaster may be waived. Please check with the agency as to whether fees can be waived in your circumstance.

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Dealing with Debt

Updated: 1 August 2018

If you have experienced a situation like this you may be able to make new arrangements to help you through this difficult time. You have a right to apply for a hardship variation from your bank or lender. A hardship variation may give you more time to pay, reduce the size of the repayments, or temporarily suspend repayments. Free financial counselling services exist to help you too.

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Dealing with Disaster

Updated: 1 June 2018

Even if you have had time to prepare to for an event of natural disaster, responding to the aftermath can be stressful and time consuming. This factsheet will help guide you through three important aspects of dealing with disaster: Insurance claims, Replacing lost documents, Dealing with debt.

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Boundary Fences

Updated: 1 June 2018

Repairing or replacing a boundary fence can be stressful and if not handled well might lead to a dispute between neighbours. However following some simple steps and seeking advice along the way can sort out any potential problems.

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Replacing Fencing

Updated: 14 January 2013

The Boundary Fences Act 1908 (Tas) determines who pays for the repair or replacement of fences.

Youth JusticeExpand

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If you are aged between 10 and 17 years and commit certain crimes, there may be some alternatives to going to court. If Police accuse you of an offence and you admit to doing the offence the Police may give you a caution or request that you participate in a community conference. You should only admit to committing an offence if you believe it is correct to do so, and you are willing to participate in an alternative to going to court. You always have the right to deny anything that the Police accuse you of oding. You can go to court to explain that you are not guilty of that offence. However, if you have committed a more serious crime, or have committed a crime before, you may need to go to court.

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Court for Young People

Updated: 1 June 2018

The Youth Division of the Magistrates Court will hear matters relating to people who were aged between 10 and 17 years at the time of the offence. Different to other Courts, the 'Youth Court' seeks to divert young people from the court system and has a broader range of sentencing options available for a young person if they are found guilty of committing an offence. If you are to appear before the Youth Division of the Magistrates Court the following contains some useful tips to prepare.

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THE YOUTH JUSTICE ACT IN BRIEF The Youth Justice Act relates to the administration of justice and operation of the court system in Tasmania. It applies to young people aged 10 years and over and under 18 years at the time of an alleged offence.

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DIVERSIONARY OPTIONS REQUIRE THAT YOU FIRST ADMIT TO HAVING COMMITTED THE ALLEGED OFFENCE If you are apprehended by the Police for committing an offence, then you can either not admit to that offence (and the matter will proceed to Court), or admit that you committed the offence.